Summer Stumper No.2

August 22, 2014

Another chance to win £100 by answering daft questions

Image: Shutterstock

 

Last one too hard for you? Well, I’m afraid this second Summer Stumper is even stumpier. Don’t forget that if you email us with all the correct answers you can muster then you could win £100 in John Lewis vouchers. Mail ‘em here before Thursday 4th September, 5pm.

Face the music

1. Which song resulted in Johnny Cash having to pay a composer $75,000 for having pinched both lyrics and melody?

2. Which 1968 Beatles song formed part of the apocalyptic manifesto of one of the twentieth-century’s most notorious criminals?

3. Which crime inspired The Boomtown Rats’ ‘I Don’t Like Mondays’?

4. Bob Dylan’s ‘Hurricane’ has nothing to do with a rapidly rotating weather system bringing spiral thunderclouds, heavy rain and storm force winds. Who’s it really about?

5. In which year was ‘I Fought The Law’ by The Clash released: 1977, 1979 or 1981?

Booked up

6. Gordon Burn’s ‘Happy Like Murderers’ is considered one of the greatest true-crime books of the twentieth century. But which ‘happy’ murderers does it profile?

7. Which explosive 1971 cookbook is banned in Australia?

8. Which book series, launched in 1997, was banned (and even, in some cases, burned) in some US states for its devilish attack on childhood innocence?

9. As you might expect, Orwell’s 1984 has been looked on askance by numerous states. But was it banned in the US or in the Soviet Union?

10. Roughly, how many books has John Grisham sold – 2.75m, 27.5m or 275m?

History corner (again)

11. English law is dignified by a wealth of delightfully dated phrases. Who, for example, was first found to have been ‘going on a frolic of his own’?

12. During the First World War, serving as a soldier could count towards the term of years of a solicitor’s training. True or false?

13. Which king gave us the phrase ‘common law’ – Henry I, II or VIII?

14. Which legal landmark became the site of Parliament during Cromwell’s rule?

15. Which of these presidents was a lawyer by trade: Kennedy, Nixon, Carter?

Newsround

16. The founder of Wikipedia has confirmed that the internet’s foremost source of dubious facts plans to resist demands to remove links to information under ‘Right to be forgotten’ legislation. What’s his name?

17. Who said, “I can’t even keep a pot plant alive for long in here”?

18. Which recent high-profile search in Sunningdale threw up old grievances about the relationship between police and press?

19. Who is Fatou Bensouda, and why is she probably not getting much sleep these days?

20. Finally, who is Oscar Pistorius’s defence lawyer: Larry Pugh, Carry Shoe, Gary Drew or Barry Roux? SP

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